Archives For pork

 

polpette

Polpette biscotte al finocchio

Italian food may be simple, but often it’s not fast: but that’s one of its charms. Good ingredients, cooked well. It’s no surprise therefore that the Slow Food movement started in Italy. Traditionally, a lot of the more time-consuming dishes would have been cooked by housewives while their husbands were out at work, and so often consist of dishes which can cook more or less unattended while you get on with other chores. A good example is the authentic ragù which would be cooked slowly for about three hours. If you’ve ever tasted a three-hour ragù, you’ll appreciate why.

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TUSCANY

This recipe is from Tuscany.

Arista

 

 

Arista is one of the great classics of Tuscan cuisine. People often assume that, considering it is consists of roast pork loin, the name is related to the Italian arrosto, meaning roast. The truth couldn’t be more different and, as with most Italian dishes, there’s a story. Here it is, as told by Pellegrino Artusi—you must know who he is by now, so I’m going to stop telling you. If this is your first time on my blog click here.

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TUSCANY

This recipe is from Tuscany.

Polpettone

Polpettone, aka meatloaf, is one of the dishes I remember my mother preparing as a child. She in turn, had been taught to make it by my real nonna, who I never met since she died before I was born. My mother’s polpettone was delicious, roasted in the oven with lashings of parmesan cheese and perfect potatoes, all held together with a tomato sauce. What memories!

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