Archives For lunch

frittata di maccheroni

Frittata di maccheroni

 

The more I learn about southern Italian cuisine the bigger the differences I see between that and northern cuisine. And, to be honest, nothing surprises me. I was recently taught this recipe by a good friend of mine from Naples and it’s already become one of my go-to favourites. As the name suggests―maccheroni in Italian is used to refer to pasta in general rather than a specific kind―this can me made with any type of pasta. In fact, it’s often used as a way of using up leftovers. I already knew that you could make delicious arancini with leftover risotto to avoid re-heating (and therefore overcooking and ruining) the rice. But this recipe is the same with pasta. Alternatively, as with this recipe, you can cook the pasta specially and just enjoy eating the dish for its own sake.

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focaccia pugliese

My friends Claudio and Filippo tucking into the focaccia.

 

This weekend, my friend Claudio was visiting from Venice. As you may have remember from this post, Claudio was born and has lived in Venice all his life, but his parents are from Puglia in the south of Italy. Claudio’s nonne are therefore a great source of typical recipes from the south of Italy, which always end up being delicious.

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Bigoli in salsa

Bigoli in salsa

 

Bigoli in salsa is one of the most classic Venetian dishes which is found mostly in the city of Venice itself, but in variations in other parts of the Veneto. It consists of a kind of pasta made with semolina flour and eggs, served in an anchovy and onion sauce. The bigoli themselves are like very thick spaghetti, and similar to Tuscan pici or bringoli except that those are made without eggs. The name is also used for a kind of wholewheat spaghetti typical to the town of Bassano del Grappa in the north of the Veneto and so these are also sometimes used. Normal spaghetti would work well if it’s all that you can find.

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TUSCANY

This recipe is from Tuscany.

Arista

 

 

Arista is one of the great classics of Tuscan cuisine. People often assume that, considering it is consists of roast pork loin, the name is related to the Italian arrosto, meaning roast. The truth couldn’t be more different and, as with most Italian dishes, there’s a story. Here it is, as told by Pellegrino Artusi—you must know who he is by now, so I’m going to stop telling you. If this is your first time on my blog click here.

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