Mazzancolle in saor: Venetian sweet and sour prawns (recipe)

September 29, 2017 — 8 Comments

An early morning trip to the Rialto fish market in Venice is always a treat. This morning, after coffee and a croissant at my favourite coffee bar in Venice, Torrefazione Cannaregio, I hopped across the Grand Canal at the Santa Sofia, traghetto (a traditional gondola ferryboat) and on to the fish market. I was in search of mazzancolle a type of king prawn in order to make one of the most Venetian of dishes, mazzancolle in saor

Saor, which roughly means sour, is a traditional way of preserving fish, which probably goes back to ancient Roman times, when fish were salted and preserved in vinegar in large barrels. The Venetians then added pine nuts, and to give it a typically veneto-oriental feel, sultanas. Traditionally it’s made with sardines or prawns.

The recipe involves frying the prawns in oil, then draining and salting them. Onions are then cooked in the same oil and white wine vinegar added. The prawns and the onions are then placed in a glass container with pine nuts and sultanas and left for at least 24 hours before eating. You can find my recipe here for sardele in saor. Just substitute cleaned and peeled king prawns for the sardines.


Bon appetito!

8 responses to Mazzancolle in saor: Venetian sweet and sour prawns (recipe)

  1. 

    I had this dish at Trattoria da Jonny in March of this year. The waiter teased me because the plate was so clean he thought I had licked it. Definitely one of my favorites.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. 

    It looks delicious, but I was wondering whether one can substitute white wine for the vinegar, as I am not that fond of sour.

    Like

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  1. Tintoretto: a new Venetian dessert (recipe) « Chestnuts and Truffles - October 2, 2017

    […] from out of town visiting and wanted to cook something typically Venetian. I planned to serve the mazzancolle in saor from the last post, a risotto al nero di seppia—more about that in a later post—but what about […]

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